People Protecting Their Ecosystem in the Lower Mekong

  • Peoples and their Ecosystem

    “Peoples and their Ecosystems: Protecting Lower Mekong Biodiversity and Resources from Large-Scale Industries Development”, referred to as PEM project, is a collaborative project, interfacing the development and conservation eorts to help reduce threats to biodiversity and people’s livelihoods posed by extractive development of minerals and water in the Lower Mekong basin. The project is jointly funded by MacArthur Foundation, Margaret A. Cargill Foundation (MAC) and Oxfam. The project has a long-term10 year vision whereby the first phase formally takes place from January 2013 to December 2015. Photo: Patrick Brown/Panos for Oxfam America

  • Thong, 24-year old farmer and a duty head of the village,

    Empowerment

    Thong, 24-year old farmer and a duty head of the village, has been trained to become a young leader in her indigenous community in Pakpoon village, Laman district of Sekong province, Laos PDR. She always takes part in patrolling activities to protect her forest, particularly Talipot palm-one of the world rare species. Thong said training women to have knowledge to protect their resource is very important. “ The forest is our life. It’s going to be hard if we lost all trees, especially Talipot palm in the protected areas. It’s the source of our living.” Said, Thong. Photo: Savann Oeurm/Oxfam

  • Bounhien, 45-year old farmer in Pakkayong village

    “I grew up seeing these palm forest as part of our life. Palm trees are the source of raw materials for our shelters, and we can create numerous other products to earn extra income for our family. Protection of palm forests will help us sustain our livelihoods.” said Bounhien, 45-year old farmer in Pakkayong village, Laman district of Sekong province. Photo: Savann Oeurm/Oxfam

  • Saving for Change

    Saving for Change

    In Cambodia, we have formed many Saving for Change (SfC) groups- a micronance lead pioneered by Oxfam in shery communities in Kratie and Rattanakiri province. The shery communities use SfC as a platform for sher-folks and farmers who are members of this group to meet on weekly or monthly basis for the saving, and they use the space to share their concerns on illegal shing activities and exchange alternative livelihood practices. Photo: Savann Oeurm/Oxfam

  • Un Eng, 43-year old woman farmer from Samphin village

    Un Eng, 43-year old woman farmer from Samphin village, said she has practiced traditional farming technique, she could get only 15 sacks of rice, which could feed her family only half a year. This year she adopted system rice intensication (SRI) technique. “ Without Oxfam and NRD, I would not have the chance to learn about SRI. Now, I can feed my family for the whole year.” said Un Eng. Photo: Savann Oeurm/Oxfam

  • Oxfam’s partners

    Oxfam’s partners play important role in supporting communities to register as fishery communities, and empowering them to manage their shery resource eectively and sustainably. Photo: Patrick Brown/Panos for Oxfam America

  • A 34-year old fishermen, Hom Sokorn

    A 34-year old shermen, Hom Sokorn, is happy to see illegal fishing activities decreased and he can catch more sh in the river to support his family. Photo: Savann Oeurm/oxfam

  •  Srey Peak, 38 years old farmer and a leader of the patrolling team in Sambor district, Kratie province.

    “Fish is the main source of our livelihood. We can’t stand to see sh in our river decreasing dramatically. Thus, our patrolling team is formed to prevent illegal shing in our shery community.” said Srey Peak, 38 years old farmer and a leader of the patrolling team in Sambor district, Kratie province. Photo: Patrick Brown/Panos for Oxfam America

  • With the support from Oxfam through PEM project, listening and dialogue clubs have been established in indigenous communities across Rattanakiri province.

    Strengthen civil society capacity

    With the support from Oxfam through PEM project, listening and dialogue clubs have been established in indigenous communities across Rattanakiri province. The listening and dialogue clubs gathers villagers weekly to listen to and discuss programs about natural resources like forests and rivers, and how to protect them. Photo: Savann Oeurm/Oxfam

  • Phoy Yab

    One of the listeners, Phoy Yab, said after listening to the programs “ Land is the life of indigenous people” he decided to form a village forestry committee and lead regular monitoring patrols in his ethnic Tompoun village’s remaining seven hectares (about 18 acres) of spirit forest, on top of a ridge and surrounded by cassava elds. Photo: Patrick Brown/Panos for Oxfam America

  • Romas Oeurn, 30-year old indigenous community reporter

    Romas Oeurn, 30-year old indigenous community reporter, said his role is to report concerns and voices from indigenous communities in Rattanakiri to broadcast on provincial radio. Photo: Savann Oeurm/oxfam

  • Gold exploration site in Rattanakiri, Cambodia

    Governmance and Private Sector Accountability

    Gold exploration site in Rattanakiri, Cambodia. Photo: Kimheng Cheng/Oxfam

  • Visit of MoE, Ratanakiri

    Ministry of Mines and Energy (MME) organized a eld visit to mining exploration sites in Rattanakiri province with representatives of the gov’t at national and sub-national, local authorities, NGOs and mining companies. The trip marked an unprecedented culture of collaboration. MME acknowledges the role of CSOs in promoting a socially responsible and environmentally friendly in extractive industries development sector. Photo: Sophoan Phean/Oxfam